Best Instant Pot Tips, Recipes and Accessories

Last week I turned to use my microwave oven only to have it glare at me with a fatal error message in its little display screen. What?!

I googled “Whirlpool” plus the error code and learned that the cost to replace the electronics that had blown out would be far greater than replacing the whole thing. Great. But not this week. Surely, I could get along without a microwave until some more convenient time to replace it, right? Wrong!

Every time I turned around it seemed I was reaching for that microwave. Within a couple of hours I realized that a microwave oven has become a staple item that is quite necessary in my typical American kitchen. But it wasn’t always that way.

I remember in 1971 when roughly 1% of households in America had a microwave oven. Most everyone liked the idea but it was also terrifying. The fear was radiation and the danger of standing within five feet of the thing and getting nuked. In 2017 a microwave oven is a minimum requirement.

Here’s my take: Instant Pot is the future’s “microwave.” While the Instant Pot company can barely keep up with the demand having sold more than 50,000,000 units so far, many people are still fearful that a pressure cooker is going to blow a hole in the roof, set the house on fire or any other number of irrational fears. Sure, pressure cookers are nothing new, but Instant Pot has taken this fabulous way of cooking to new levels of technology and safety.

Soon, I predict, Instant Pot will become an ordinary basic  kitchen appliance. New homes will come with Instant Pot built into the countertop. Top-of-the line cooktops will come complete with Instant Pot. And we’ll laugh about the days when people were afraid.

Instant Pot comes with an owner manual and recipe book. Both should be considered required reading but honestly, I found them to be unbearably boring while only marginally useful. What follows are the websites, tips, tricks and accessories that put me onto the fast track to falling in love with my Instant Pot IP-DUO60 7-in-1 Multi-Functional Pressure Cooker, 6Qt/1000W. I was cooking dinner the very first day, that’s how doable it is to master Instant Pot.

QUICK START

Perform the Instant Pot Water Test. Do not skip this.

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Foolproof Plan to Save $1,000

The most important thing you can do to make your personal economy strong is to have an umbrella—an emergency fund with at least enough money to pay all of your bills for three to six months. Wait. Cannot even imagine being able to save that much? No worries. Start small. Let’s say $1,000.

Weekly, save 10 percent of your paycheck. Too much? OK, start with 5 percent or even 1 percent and build up from there. Just start!

FIRST THING. This is going to be hard, but I know you can do it: Make your planned savings amount the very first bill you pay—before anything else. Once you have accumulated say $50, go to your bank or credit union and open a savings account. While you are there, set up an automatic deposit authorization into your emergency savings account. Here’s a secret: You won’t miss what you don’t see in the first place. Okay, you’ll miss it for the first few paychecks, but soon you really will not miss it.

GET RID OF NON-ESSENTIALS. Give up the little things such as cable TV, eating out, and gym membership and landline. That’s a start, you’ll know instinctively how to add to this list.

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Let the Decluttering Begin

I know it’s time. It’s been time for at least two years, possibly longer. I need to clean my kitchen. Now, before you send the Health Department to my address, let me explain. What I mean by “clean” is that I need to clean out and organize my kitchen pantry, cupboards and drawers.

Kitchen Clutter

Photo credit: misteraitch

If you walked into my kitchen, you’d see a tidy and sanitary place. But don’t walk into the pantry or open a cupboard too hastily. Something might hit you on the head. At this moment, a bottle of Advil has been tossed on top of cereal boxes, which are resting on pudding boxes that have long ago expired.

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Best Inexpensive Cordless Handheld Vacuum

To say that I have had a love/hate relationship with handheld vacuums for many years would be to put it mildly. I love the idea of a handheld cordless vacuum that is charged up and always ready to make a quick pick-up—in fact, that’s pretty much on my list of life’s necessities.

But I hate when the thing runs for only a few minutes before it needs to be recharged and has such weak suction it really doesn’t do a very good job of picking anything up. It’s enough to make me want to pull my hair out!

I’m sure it’s been 30 years or longer since I got my first handheld Dustbuster. It would hold a charge for maybe two minutes if all the stars were properly aligned and I held it in just the right position. And the thing completely failed after only a short time—refusing to hold any charge at all.

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How to Stop Unwanted Charity Junk Mail Plus Annoying White Lint in Dark Dryer Loads

According to one online organization working to eliminate junk mail, the average adult receives 41 pounds of junk mail each year—44% of it going to the landfill unopened. Sadly, much of it is from charities that are doing good in the world—all of them vying for our charitable donations.

Dear Mary: You recently wrote about paper shredders, which made me think about all the unwanted address labels my mother receives from charities. She has made a few donations other the years, and is now bombarded with unwanted mailing labels, cards, calendars, books, you name it. Some of the stuff you can give or throw away, but what do you do with all the labels? If you try shredding them, they jam up your shredder.

I’ve tried writing “Refused, Return to Sender” on the envelopes, but the post office refuses to send them back, ignoring my refusal. Any ideas on how can you get this type of mail stopped or getting rid of all the address labels? Peg

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Secret to Growing Wealth: Automate!

This is a Book Reivew by Jeff Tompkins, Jr.  The opinions expressed herein are the reviewer’s own and meant only for informational purposes.

The Automatic Millionaire by David Bach

Reviewer: Jeff Tompkins, Jr.

Let’s face it, unless you’re a Marine, you’re probably not that crazy about the word “discipline.” It smacks of rules and constraints. Most of us just aren’t that keen to always do even those things that we know are good for us. Particularly in our financial lives. We know we should save more, spend less, invest smarter. We should be disciplined in these areas to achieve financial security.  So how do we get disciplined? According to the The Automatic Millionaire, by David Bach, we automate .

Bach focuses first on the idea of paying ourselves first. By this he doesn’t mean setting aside a couple of twenty dollar bills under your mattress each payday.  That would require discipline and the central theme of The Automatic Millionaire is that no one is disciplined enough to regularly save that way. Instead, Mr. Bach argues that the only way to get around our lack of discipline is to automate paying ourselves first, effectively taking our lack of discipline out of the equation.

Automating ones savings is becoming more and more prevalent in a tech-dominated world. It’s automatic, because once you set it up you don’t have to do a thing each month for it to continue putting funds into your 401k account or other savings vehicle. It’s the first money out so before you do any spending at all, you are saving.

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Dinner-in-a-Box is Not at All What I Thought!

Over the past year or so I’ve been hearing a lot about a new way to get dinner on the table. Every month or so another one of these meal kit delivery services would contact me to give it a try.

Seriously? Who in their right mind would trust seafood, meat and produce from some unknown assembly plant, piled onto a loading dock then moved into the back of an unrefrigerated FedEx truck for who knows how long and until some delivery guy leaves it on the porch?

The whole idea sounded ridiculously expensive, if not just plain gross. I didn’t need to test the obvious so I did what comes all too naturally for me: I jumped to conclusions. Turns out I was way off base and so wrong. Today I’m here to come clean and set the record straight.

Several weeks ago I casually mentioned the meal kit option for super busy households. I had just started testing one of these meal kit services. I determined that Home Chef is the least expensive and invited two other families to help me test. I set out to get a true, unbiased picture of how this works and what it’s all about. I needed honest, real-life feedback.

One of my testers was a young bachelor in California—a very picky eater with limited cooking skills. The other, a local family of four with two children ages 7 and 2.

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8 Wedding Gift Hacks

Wedding season is in full bloom and while tying the knot is getting more expensive for the bride and groom, attending a wedding is becoming costlier, too. In fact, a survey from American Express reveals that it now costs on average $539 to attend a single celebration.

Gifts take a big bite out of every guest’s budget with average spending ranging from $75 to $175 per person, according to The Knot Registry Survey. Relieve the financial pressure by saving on the gift with these eight tips.

Compare prices on registry items. It’s wise to reference a registry to see what the couple wants, but it’s even smarter to compare prices among stores. Online retailers like Amazon and Overstock sell popular registry brands for less than most high-end stores.

Use discount gift cards. If you’re planning to give a gift card or you’re buying an item off a couple’s registry, save money by purchasing discount gift cards from GiftCardGranny.com. The site offers gift cards for less than face value, like a $100 Macy’s gift card for less than $80.

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