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Why Everyday Cheapskate?

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                        Mary Hunt

It was 1992. We’d been paying down the debt for more than 10 years, and I was sick of it. With only $12,000 to go, I got this wild hair to start a subscription newsletter (print delivered by U.S. mail because if you’re counting, there was no Internet then; no email either). I named it Cheapskate Monthly and honestly, I had no idea what I was doing. But I had a decade of experience in repaying debt. I knew a lot about that! And I was passionate to raise $12,000. I figured I could do that in one year, and be done with that unspeakable nightmare.

Long story short, Oprah called, Dr. James Dobson called, every major newspaper in the country wanted an interview. Within a year my subscriber base shot to the moon. Learning to spend less while living well seemed like such a new idea!

All these years later that print newsletter has morphed into Everyday Cheapskate blog. Getting out of debt is hard work. Even more difficult for many is learning to live on less than we earn so we can stay out of debt! 

Everyday Cheapskate is not only a daily post. We are a tightly knit community of people who’ve learned that we need to stay focused on ways we can save money by cutting expenses, thinking differently, gaining strength, courage, and ideas from one another.

Truth be told, Everyday Cheapskate is my personal maintenance system. You have no idea how easily I could slip back into my old, debilitating, spendthrift ways. Writing, researching and responding to my EC family is the way I stay on track.

How to get started

You’ve already taken the first step—you’re here, and I’m so happy to see you. When you sign up for free membership, I’ll start sending my best ideas, tips, tricks, and home hacks for how to save time and money—via email daily!

Do I have a story for you

It was a really bad day. Possibly the worst day of my life. So I did what I suppose any woman who’d ruined her husband’s life and managed to throw their home into foreclosure would do: I had a meltdown.

It’s not like I meant to do anything wrong. In fact, for 12 years I did what I was invited to do: I used credit cards to bridge the gap between my husband’s salary and the lifestyle I so richly deserved

Continue …

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