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9 Easy Moves That Will Simplify Your Spending

Confused and stressed out about how to manage your money so you don’t run out before payday? Put these nine easy moves into action and you’ll be well on your way to simplify your spending.

a chess board covered in US five dollar bills with chess pieces in play

 

I know what you’re thinking—simplify and spending in the same sentence? Ha! Like that’s even possible when we have credit cards, debit cards, bank accounts, bills, bill-pay, auto-pay, fees, penalties, interest rates, and fees to keep track of. How can we possibly make managing money simple?

By having a plan. By choosing to become accountable and then using every tactic possible to streamline and de-stress your money.

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The Secret to Staying Out of the Red and in the Black

When I am not writing about personal finance and consumer debt, I knit. Something about the gentle rhythm of yarn and needle calms my spirit and unwinds my brain.

professional woman sitting at her desk, knitting.

I have managed to finish a few projects, not because I’m a great knitter but because I can “tink” almost as well as I knit (knit spelled backward is tearing out).

Because all knitters make mistakes, tinking is a required skill for those who take the craft seriously. It doesn’t take too many oversized sweaters or undersized hats to figure out that the smallest error at the beginning of a project can produce disastrous results if not found and corrected.

Just two options

Money is a lot like knitting. By some miracle, all knitting consists of just two stitches: knit and purl. Likewise, with money you have two options: spend or save. And who among us can say they have never made a financial error? We all make mistakes but the secret to staying out of the red is correcting the little mistakes before they lead to disastrous results.

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When You’re Stuck and Can’t Get Going

A question I receive nearly every day goes something like this: I’m ready to take back control of my finances. But how do I get started? It’s like I’m stuck.

Don’t think you are alone if you find yourself wanting to do all the steps at once. But that could be a big mistake. If you were building a house, you wouldn’t try to pour the foundation, raise the walls and put on the roof all at the same time. It’s the same with building a plan to manage your money. You need to take things one step at a time …

 

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First, you need to lay the foundation. I call this initial step “tracking.” You cannot manage what you cannot measure. 

Tracking means knowing exactly where every penny goes. If you bring home $793.42 this week, next week you should be able to account for every single cent. Where did that money go?

I suggest that you track on a daily basis. The only way to do that is to write it down. Every morning start with a fresh sheet of paper or note on your smartphone. Somehow, come up with a method that works for you. Throughout the day write as you spend any amount of money, write it down. You need to record just two things: How much did you spend and what did you spend it on? How much, what for. Got it?

Do this for at least 30 days (longer may be necessary if you are really in a financial fog). One sheet of paper or note per day. Then just stash them away into a safe place and start fresh the next day. Ideally, both you and your spouse, partner or person with whom you share your finances should be tracking. 

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