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Recently, while brainstorming with a reader who needed to supplement her regular full-time job, I made a quick list of the ways I’ve done that in my life. I wanted to help her discover what she does well that others might pay her to do for them. 

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Process Server

I worked as an independent process server for a company that attorneys hire to have subpoenas delivered in their civil cases. Whenever I had a couple of hours to spare, I’d pop into the office, pick up a stack of subpoenas and head out to attempt to “serve” unsuspecting defendants in civil lawsuits.

My mission was to locate the defendant then address the said person by name (Laura … Laura Smith?). By law, I was required to make sure I had eye contact, wait for that look of “knowing” and then hand off the document. Even if the person refused it, turning to walk (run) away, I could legally assert that I had completed the mission.

The best part? I got paid $35 per attempt to serve. That means if I knocked on the door and no one was home, attempt complete and back into the stack that document would go for a future attempt.

I could easily “attempt to serve” two or three subpoenas per hour. The attorney service company I worked for loved me because I was available at odd times, like late at night or early on a Saturday.

Process servers are legally required to serve papers in the correct manner laid out by their state. Process serving laws differ by state. But basically, if you are an adult, have not been convicted of a crime and can engage strangers in a warm and friendly way, it’s possible that you too could be a process server in your spare time.

Piano Teacher

I got started young at age 15 as a student teacher in a music academy. I loved it—not so much the teaching, but the $5 per lesson. My little students did well and soon I was teaching on my own, at home after school.

Teaching piano lessons was the way I paid my way through college. At one point I had 72 students, giving  30-minute individual and group lessons per week. Read more

Last week, as a grateful family and community welcomed home 8-year-old Leia Carrico, and her 5-year-old sister Caroline, who’d been missing for two days in the Northern California wilderness, I was moved to tears by the bravery of these adorable girls and their stunning ability to move quickly into survival mode.

Two cute kids hiking in the forest depicting the need to be able to survive a crisis

Stock photo 123rf.com

Could you live through such crises? How about an income disaster? If you get the infamous pink slip tomorrow, will you know what to do? 

Don’t panic

It is essential that you keep your head and your cool, as demonstrated so aptly by young Leia who told reporters, “We needed to find shelter fast!”

The first few minutes of any crisis are critical. If you lose it now, you will waste precious energy. At the moment of impact, take a huge deep breath and stay calm. While a job loss can be a devasting shock, it is not life-threatening. There is a way out and you will find it.

Rally the troops

Your attitude will make or break your ability to lead in a crisis. Equate survival with adventure and exciting new opportunities, resiliency, and creativity.

Read more