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More Amazing Ways to Use Hydrogen Peroxide Around the House

In response to an earlier post,  I heard from one of my readers who wrote to describe her experience with hydrogen peroxide—something I’ve written about in the past, but not so much in the context of this reader’s personal report.

 

woman-using-hydrogen-peroxide-for-mouthwash

Caren’s story and outcome (below) captured my attention, but I needed first to confirm that hydrogen peroxide is safe, reasonable and recommended to be used as a mouthwash. In the process I ran into a whole lot more than I was looking for—so many more uses for hydrogen peroxide around the house—some new some not so new but perhaps forgotten.

MORE:  The Wonders of Hydrogen Peroxide

Kitchen counters

Clean your counters, table tops with hydrogen peroxide to kill germs and leave a fresh smell. Simply put a little on your dishrag when you wipe, or spray it on the counters.

Cutting boards

After rinsing off your wooden cutting board, pour hydrogen peroxide on it to kill salmonella and other bacteria. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has approved hydrogen peroxide as a sanitizer.

Teeth whitening

The most affordable way to whiten teeth at home (and the remedy supported by the most significant body of research) is the main ingredient from most tooth-whitening products: hydrogen peroxide.

To whiten teeth with hydrogen peroxide: Mix salt, baking soda, and hydrogen peroxide to make a paste for brushing your teeth. Not only will this help to reverse the early stages of gingivitis, used regularly, it will also remove stains and whiten your teeth.

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An Ounce of Prevention is Worth Money in the Bank

Today’s topic is not pretty, but unless you have $8,000 earmarked to treat periodontal disease, an ounce of good dental care could prevent a lot of pain—both dental and financial. 

Man with horrible toothache holding his hand to his jaw wincing in pain

Periodontal disease is an infection that destroys the attachment fibers and supporting bones that hold the teeth in the jaw bone and the bone itself. Bacteria get caught between the teeth and also under the gum, forming a sticky substance called “plaque,” that hardens to form tartar.

This leads to an infection known as gingivitis. As it spreads deeper into the bone it begins to decay and pus forms, which causes swelling, redness, and bleeding. If not treated, the teeth will become loose and fall out.

Here, let me show you what advanced dental disease looks like:

 

An open mouth showing dental disease

Does that get your attnetion?! Great because there are relatively inexpensive measures you can take to prevent this ugly situation and all of the very expensive treatments required to treat and (hopefully) reverse. It’s called routine preventive dental care.

If you remove the soft plaque from the gum margin around the teeth you will toughen the gum and prevent the disease. Here’s how to do that: Read more

Put a Big Smile on Your Face with a Dental Savings Plan

I opened my inbox and right near the top was a frantic letter from Lisa, who’s facing an emergency dental situation with a $15,000 price tag on it. She is desperate for options that will let her keep her teeth while not plunging her into debt.

smiling woman

 

Another letter from the Madison family related that their finances are so tight, they cannot afford the luxury of regular dental care—not even routine x-rays and cleaning. That letter ended, “Is there a dental plan for families in our situation? Please answer soon before our teeth fall out!”


RELATED: Would You Floss for $8,000?


While I am not a dentist, I know that dental care is not a luxury. It is essential to the good health of every family member. And the best way for Lisa and the Madison Family to avoid big dental bills is to practice regular preventive care. Even then, routine hygiene and x-rays should be seen as absolutely mandatory.

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