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10 Things to Know About Lestoil

Ever had the occasion to wonder where you’ve been all your life? That’s my reaction to a simple heavy-duty cleaning product, Lestoil. Apparently, it’s been manufactured right here in the U.S.A. for more than 80 years—and loved by many. Curiously, I’d never heard of it until just a few months ago.

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On the off chance you, too, are not familiar with the powerful cleaner of all things hopelessly stained, here are 10 things you will enjoy knowing.

1. Lestoil is a heavy-duty multi-purpose household cleaner that can be used full-strength on stains—especially really difficult stains; the kind of stains you just give up on like ink, toner, grease, oil, scuff marks, blood, lipstick, nail polish, paint, grass stains, coffee stains, crayon and marker stains on every surface you can imagine—even the sticky stuff left behind by stickers and labels.

2. Lestoil has been around since 1933. While I have not been around quite that long, this makes me wonder where I have been since I’ve only learned about Lestoil in the past few months.

3. Lestoil has removed every old stain I’d given up on as well as every new stain I’ve acquired since the two of us met—on clothing, carpet, concrete and all kinds of patio furniture including molded plastic. It removed black stains that accumulated on outdoor furniture covers. It made short order of some ugly stains on cultured stone. It removed that gross, sticky residue that shows up on vinyl and plastic, restoring it back to its former glory. So far, Lestoil has worked on everything I’ve tried.

4. Lestoil contains, among other things, sodium tallate, which is a type of soap. This means that once the job is done, it must rinsed out, washed off or otherwise removed to make sure the item being treated doesn’t retain a residue that will attract a new stain.

How I Inadvertently Saved the Day for One Historic San Francisco Hotel

In the two decades since founding Debt-Proof Living (formerly Cheapskate Monthly), I’ve logged more than 1.5 million air miles for book tours, speaking events and television and radio shows. It’s been and continues to be great fun and I have mostly loved every moment.

As you might imagine, many funny things have happened to me on my travels. But none can top what happened in San Francisco.

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The year was 1998. I was in San Francisco to appear on a local television show. The producer had asked me to bring props that would create some visual interest as I would be demonstrating some of the great tips I’d been publishing in my monthly newsletter.

I arrived the evening before and checked into one of San Francisco’s finest historic downtown hotels before taking a cab to a local grocery store to pick up the props I would need for the show. I wanted the biggest sizes I could find of things like baking soda and white vinegar. I figured that would be easier than trying to carry all of that on the plane.

Knowing I would need only visual representations, I decided to empty all of the containers in order to lighten my load and make the trip to the studio the following day a bit more manageable. After all, I only needed the containers, not the contents.

Despite the fact that I would be wasting a lot of perfectly good stuff, in the interest of convenience and ease, I dumped the large box of baking soda into the toilet and flushed. A few minutes later, I poured a gallon of white vinegar down the toilet and flushed again.

4 Big Money Mistakes to Avoid

I’m going to guess you’ve made a financial mistake or two in your life. Who hasn’t? For some of us, it was more than an occasional late fee or random urge to overspend that brought us to our financial knees. But I’m not talking about the kind of blunders that got us into trouble—we could list those in our sleep. Instead, I want to focus on the mistakes people make while they’re working their way back to financial health.

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Whether you’re recovering from a season of unemployment or from a financial mess you created on your own, avoid these goofs and you’ll get where you want to go much faster.

1. Not saving. You’ve heard this plenty, and here it comes again: Jump to the front of the line—ahead of your creditors—when you divvy up your paycheck. Get over feeling guilty about keeping money for yourself.

You’ll need enough in your fund to pay all your bills for at least six months. But don’t let that big number discourage you. Start by saving enough to live on for two weeks, then up it to one month, and so on until you reach goal.

Put your savings on autopilot—you won’t miss what you don’t see. Commit to saving 10 percent of every paycheck. If you can’t start there, start with 2 percent. Then in a few weeks, change it to 5 percent, then 7 and so forth until you reach at least 10 percent.

2. Paying for college. If you must make a choice between adequately funding your own retirement and paying for your kids’ college education, put retirement first. The best gift you can give your kids is to make sure you won’t become a financial burden to them in your sunset years.

Kids have far more options for funding their college education than you have for your retirement. They’ve got scholarships, grants, financial aid, student loans, work-study programs and the not-to-be-forgotten method of working their way through college. Once your own future is secure and you’re out of debt, that’s when you’re in a position to help pay for education.

How to Splurge on a Budget

I got the biggest shock of my life the day I realized that living on a budget wasn’t the straitjacket or rigid “diet” I assumed it would be. In fact, it was my life as a credit-card junkie that put me in financial bondage.

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A budget saved my life because it allowed me to get out of debt. It gave me back my freedom. Want to know my secret for staying on a budget for so many years? I splurge. Seriously. And I do not feel guilty. I love nice things and I love to travel.

How to Live on a Budget and Love It

For many years I wouldn’t have anything to do with a budget because I couldn’t stand the idea of anyone—or anything—telling me how to spend my money. And where did that get me? Into one big financial mess.

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Every month, when I ran out of money, I would turn to MasterCard and Visa for a bailout. Really bad idea.

What I learned from going through that experience and finding my way back to solvency is that, as much as we may loathe it, a budget is the ticket to financial happiness―not the straitjacket I feared it would be. I’ve come to prefer to call this a “spending plan” rather than a  budget, but honestly, the terms are interchangeable. It’s just a way to pre-spend your income on paper first.

A good spending plan gives every dollar a specific job to do. Once you have it just the way you want it, the plan becomes a handy road map for keeping your finances on track.

So, take a deep breath and let’s walk through the basics of creating a simple budget, or spending plan.

Step 1: Write down your total take-home monthly income. This is the easy part. Jot down what you earn. Because many expenses are billed monthly, it makes good sense to use monthly income to create your budget.

Step 2: Write down your fixed expenses. Start with fixed bills like rent, mortgage, car payment, credit-card debt and insurance, then factor in other monthly costs that are always the same. These are your essential fixed expenses.

Step 3: List your variable expenses. You know you’ll have these bills, but the amounts vary. Examples are your phone, utilities, food, household expenses, gasoline, medication, public transportation, shoes and clothing. You can assign an estimated amount to each based on past experience, rounding to the closest $10.

Step 4: List reasonable amounts for nonessential expenses. This includes entertainment, eating out, hobbies and other ways you spend money on a regular basis.

Step 5: Find the extras. Go to your checkbook register, credit card statements, Quicken reports or what have you, to see what expenses you’ve left out. You’ll likely see items for car maintenance and repair, gifts, vacations, Christmas and holidays. For items that do not recur monthly, determine the annual cost, then divide by 12 to see how much you should set aside each month to anticipate that irregular expense.

Step 6: Figure out your totals. Add up your expenses, then subtract that amount from your income. Ideally, you’ll come out in the black, with at least a little money left over. But if your expenses exceed your income, you’ll see a negative sum. Don’t panic—this is just the start of an ongoing process.

Step 7: See where you can cut. If you came up short, go back to your monthly expenses and see what you can get rid of. Look first to your nonessential expenses. Which items can you remove altogether for a while (eating out seems like a fine target; perhaps hobby expenses, for a season)? Keep going through the list, making adjustments until your total expenses are less than your income.

Step 8: Follow your spending plan as closely as possible. Track your spending every day. Take notes and research ways you’ll be able to do even better next month. At month’s end, add up your actual spending and compare it with what you planned. Use this information to create the next month’s Spending Plan.

Even if you find yourself in a particularly tight financial position right now, take heart. As you pay off debts and find more ways to cut expenses, you’ll begin to sense a significant loosening of financial pressure. Soon you’ll be ready to add new categories to your spending plan for things like saving for a new car, home improvements or going back to college.

The sooner you get started, the sooner you’ll be on your way to reaching financial freedom.

Best Toys for Kids Ages 3 to 7

I saw the most amazing thing recently. A little girl I’m guessing to be about 2-years-old, reached for her daddy’s iPhone, turned it on, input the password then sat back to watch something that required no effort on her part. It was seriously cute for about 20 seconds, until I realized that wasn’t the first time she’d done that.

I watched that little child go from being actively engaged with her parents and her surroundings to being a totally passive observer. Which brings me to the subject of toys.

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The best toys–and the ones we should be vigorously introducing to children from a very young age–are toys that promote creativity and stimulate mental development, while at the same time are fun to play with.

Selective Focus Makes Life Good

I kinda’ let the cat out of the bag the other day, when I told you that the hubs and I sold our big house and are now living in a tiny apartment.

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But don’t cry for me. We are having the time of our lives.

Living in this tiny space is mostly tolerable because I know it is temporary. I know the exact day, date and time we’re moving out. I’m learning that I can handle just about anything challenging as long as I know it won’t last forever.

I’ve also learned the value and joy of choosing to focus on things that are positive for which I am grateful.

Kitchen. What’s not to enjoy about a kitchen (I use the term loosely) in which I can make dinner, rinse the dishes, load them into the dishwasher, put something into the fridge and move clothes from washer to dryer—without having to take more than two steps. That’s tiny. Amazing, too.

Mary’s Big Remodel – Part 17

They say that a picture is worth 1,000 words. That’s good because I don’t have the words to describe just how happy and grateful I am for this amazing transformation. Even more amazing, we’re under budget with only trim around the window and inserts in the drawers left to purchase.

I didn’t know a person could be as grateful for a sink as I am for this:

And this ….

Just in case you forgot what this 40-year old kitchen looked like last July, here’s a reminder ….

Our work is not done … we still have to clear and clean the patio where we’ve been staging, storing and building stuff and then finish and furnish the family room or, as I like to call it, the rest of  my new Great Room 🙂